A little story
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@silentC said in A little story:

@Johnc said in A little story:

I simply don’t understand the hard rights fascination for coal

It’s not so much a fascination for coal as a desire to not let those left wing greenies think they have won.

Yeah, I think some in the right still think that climate change is some greenie conspiracy.

As far as tax on carbon goes, it is the best mechanism for reducing carbon emissions.

@dog said in A little story:

As far as tax on carbon goes, it is the best mechanism for reducing carbon emissions.

I still don’t get why it’s so bad to tax carbon. People scream about power prices going up, but I don’t recall them going down when they removed it previously.

As far as tax on carbon goes, it is the best mechanism for reducing carbon emissions.
The above statement is genuine bullshit. A tax on carbon does absolutely nothing to reduce carbon emissions, this is merely a fairy tale from the left.
Until you can come up with a way that the actual producer is penalised for producing CO2, instead of them just passing the penalty on to the consumer, it remains a fairy tale.

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Sorry I should have said ‘price’ on carbon. An ETS or other mechanisms to price carbon are not a product of the left. They were devised by economists​ who generally​ aren’t left wing. These are ‘market’ mechanisms.

Regardless of what you call it, it is still does nothing to reduce the CO2, as stated before the consumer pays and the CO2 still gets produced.

After we brought in a carbon tax CO2 emissions fell, when we removed it they started to rise again, this is what market mechanisms do.

I don’t know, I still favour direct action because it’s just too easy for them to sit on their hands and pass the costs on, which is pretty much what happened last time, although I would have to concede they didn’t really give it much time to have an impact.

However I need to point out that when the carbon tax was removed, my supplier at the time (Dodo) DID cut their prices and we received a letter advising us it was due to the carbon tax being removed.

last edited by silentC
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The prices did drop by about 7% after the abolition of the carbon tax. The price have subsequently increased by more than that and is about to rise significantly.

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@silentC said in A little story:

I don’t know, I still favour direct action because it’s just too easy for them to sit on their hands and pass the costs on, which is pretty much what happened last time, although I would have to concede they didn’t really give it much time to have an impact.

However I need to point out that when the carbon tax was removed, my supplier at the time (Dodo) DID cut their prices and we received a letter advising us it was due to the carbon tax being removed.

This is where a cap and trade scheme makes the most sense. There is a cap on emissions meaning that the economy can’t produce more carbon. If a business wants/needs to produce carbon then they can buy/trade for certificates that allow them to produce a certain amount but they must buy these from existing emitters.

The carbon price did however make renewables more competitive and this drove significant investment.

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Turns out that repealing the Carbon Tax actually will cost us dearly.

Why you’re about to pay through the nose for power

It was a rare moment of triumph for a prime minister frustrated in his dealings with a difficult Senate.
Just on three years ago, a jubilant Tony Abbott — having just secured agreement to vanquish the carbon tax, the handbrake on the Australian economy — appeared on national television.
Australian households would be $550 a year better off with the removal of the “toxic” carbon tax, he declared. Gas prices would fall 7 per cent.
Electricity prices are expected to go up by as much as 20 per cent this year! How did this happen? Catch up with the ABC’s new podcast, Tell Me Straight.
Electricity prices would drop 9 per cent. Everyone would be a winner, he told 7.30’s Leigh Sales.
“Because the price of power is a component of just about every price in the economy. When the price of power falls, other prices should go down as well,” he said.
Yep, it should. Except when it doesn’t.
Ever since the carbon tax was removed, power prices have only headed one way; upwards. This, at a time when oil prices have halved and coal slumped.
And then last week, Australians were greeted with alarming headlines like this in The Australian: POWER PRICE HIKE SHOCK SPREADS.
Or this one in the Australian Financial Review: ENERGY PRICES GOING UP: HOW HOUSEHOLDS IN SOME STATES WILL SUFFER.
After doubling over the past five years, electricity prices will rise another 20 per cent this year.
Gas, now a key component in the electricity debacle, has become a controversy in its own right with domestic shortages and prices trebling in recent years.

In May 2014, I was paying 31 cents ex GST and the service charge was $1.36.

In February 2015 it had dropped to 29 cents, following the repeal of the carbon tax.

My last bill from Dodo I was paying 25 cents + $1.40 per day and I am now paying 24 cents per kwh + $1.40 per day with Red Energy.

If it goes up 20% I will be paying 29 cents, so I’ll still be better off than during the carbon tax.

I don’t know how the numbers work out for others, but that is what I have experienced.

last edited by silentC

Not power but I recall about 20 years ago when the dollar was like a yo yo, I was buying US magazines for about $4.00, the dollar plummeted to about 70c and the mags went up to about $7.50, a few months later the dollar shot back up to about $1 and the magazines remained the same, to me it indicates profiteering.
I don’t think power companies are any different and I get pissed of with gas prices going up every year because of the North American winter, even though we produce our own gas.

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