Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.

@bunyip said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

Bugger, beat me to the draw, plenty of mouldy wimmin everywhere.

Haven’t you already been told to keep away from those graveyards? :D

Necrophilia is dead boring…

As I’ve said before for those born in other countries it’s no shock, for many others born in Australia to parents of other nationalities, I can truly understand their lack of awareness.

Italy carries its citizenship for two generations, Britain through the father generally (my father was six (or was it eight) in 1926 when he came to Aus and I had no idea I was a pom until I was almost 60 - 80 years after he arrived!)

Dutch citizenship is lost for dual nationals who don’t keep their passports current. Irish runs through the mother’s side…

I would love to see Bill Shorten’s dad a Pom… ahh, no… one other requirement is that his mother and father had to be married at the time of his birth…:laughing:

I’m not comfortable with the fact that other countries can award citizenship on non residents of their own country who are born elsewhere, based on those people having parents or grandparents that are citizens of said country.

If you are born in Australia to parents who are residents and citizens of Australia and have never actively sought citizenship of the country of your parents or grandparents birth, and in some cases, have never even set foot within that country, then I fail to see how that country can claim you as their citizen without you having any say in the matter.

I can’t see the constitution being changed, and those who framed it way back when could not have foreseen this situation arising.

Should be easy for the parliament to pass something (other than the shit they carry on with currently), that disallows other countries from automatically awarding citizenship to Australian citizens.

If you want to take up citizenship of another country, then apply for it and don’t let the door slam into your arse as you leave.

last edited by madbugger

@madbugger said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

If you are born in Australia to parents who are residents and citizens of Australia and have never actively sought citizenship of the country of your parents or grandparents birth, and in some cases, have never even set foot within that country, then I fail to see how that country can claim you as their citizen without you having any say in the matter.

But when the shoe is on the other foot… let’s say you were born in Korea, because your dad was the rep for Foster’s brewing and was doing a two year stint there… under your rules you would be Korean not Australian. You have no say in it.

The logic is not whether a country can claim you or not, it is simply a matter of fitting in certain boxes.

I have a daughter and son-in-law who took British citizenship a few years ago, and fair enough they were working in good jobs for many years (became citizens after seven years). That’s morally the right thing to do I think, if you are benefitting from a country, paying taxes, entitled to a pension… you should be able to vote!

Since their return to Aus, they have had two sons, neither of whom have had their births registered as “British Citizens” yet both undeniably are.
The world is not the place it was a hundred years ago, and perhaps it’s time to forget the parochial notion of “nationality” - much in the vein of French President Macron’s response to Trump’s “make America great again” - which was “Let’s make the PLANET great again” we live in the world now, not just some piddling little island on it and on your return your parents would have to apply for a visa for you.

Friends have comparatively recently adopted a child from Vanuatu - that process took them almost three years. Would your parents be happy to stretch their two year stint to five just to get their new Korean baby a visa? Would that even be fair?

last edited by bitingmidge

The only answer to this is a new double dissolution election.

Don’t blame the constitution, it’s been around for nearly 120 years.

Clear the decks re citizenship and have another go.
Maybe we’ll get better than what we’ve got.
But probably we won’t

@Craig said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

Don’t blame the constitution, it’s been around for nearly 120 years.

But comes from a time when every “Australian” was a British subject! Don’t blame it, interpret it!

You are correct though - how could so many have missed the point?

According to Wikepedia, at least one person has known about this in the past:

" Gillard held dual Australian/British citizenship until she renounced her British citizenship prior to entering the Australian parliament in 1998"

Nick Xenophon is the latest in the mix

[You are correct though - how could so many have missed the point?]

I’m struggling to understand how any of them could have missed the point. I have dual nationality. I was born in England and I became an Aussie citizen some years ago. I’ve never wanted to stand for political office but I’ve known for a long time that, if I did want to become a pollie, I’d have to renounce my Pommieship.

Furthermore, these buggers have to sign a form in order to comply with the Constitution. Wouldn’t that make them pause and think? Clearly not, it seems.

I think it is time to alter the constitution, if you are born in Australia and have not applied for citizenship elsewhere then there should be no barrier to entering parliament. If born overseas it opens up a different set of problems but I think Waters who was born in Canada to Australian citizens and registered as an Aussie is in the same basket. Young Nick was just unlucky he thought he was either Greek or a Cypriot it didn’t occur to him e could be a Pom courtesy of a quirk of history. I reckon it is to complicated there must be a better way

@Col said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

I’m struggling to understand how any of them could have missed the point. I have dual nationality. I was born in England and I became an Aussie citizen some years ago.

If you were born in another country that’s easy.

I have a friend (who is in exactly the same position as a certain politician) whose grandparents were Italian and came to Australia while pregnant with his mother. He discovered not long ago at the age of fifty, that he was an Italian citizen.

In my own case, my father was Welsh and was brought here in 1926 (that’s ninety years ago…) I had understood that I was entitled to some sort of Pommy visa or passport, in much the same way that his grandchildren can an ancestry visa to allow them to work in the UK for an extended period (they are not citizens, but are entitled to apply for citizenship after living in Pommy land for seven years continuously. Ironically (and sorry if I’ve mentioned this before) one of my daughters and her husband did just that before returning home, and now have two Australian/Pommie boys, neither of whose births have been registered in the UK, but the facts are they are Poms by virtue of having two parents of that nationality, and Australian for the same reason although they were born here.

It is quite easy to see a situation where they could be raised without any awareness of their dual nationality.

I was completely unaware that I was a Pom (and my father never knew) until at around age 60 I applied for a passport. The important thing here is that I did not apply, did not register my birth or status at any time. I was just born a Pom and there was nothing I could do about it. Applying for a passport was simpler than applying for my Aussie one (and cheaper). The passport did not make me a citizen, it just provided the world with evidence that I was.

Like Nick, I had no concept that a six year old immigrant who lived his whole life in Aus, fought in wars, voted, and got paid a pension was anything but Australian. Had I run for parliament and been asked if my old man was a Pom, I would have said no. But there it was, in black and white. We left the passport open on the dining room table for a week and kept staring at two words in disbelief - “British Citizen”.

My sympathies go to those in similar situations!

last edited by bitingmidge

My FIL came here at age 7 and was told he was naturalised when his father was. He was on the voters roll and in all aspects believed he was an Aussie it was only when applying for a passport that he discovered he was still Italian. If he had of been naturalised as a youngster my wife and daughters would have been considered Australian and not entitled to apply for an Italian passport. However because he wasn’t they are considered dual citizens even though they are all born here and have never tried to claim that heritage. S44 is far reaching and based on what other counties consider not our own, it will be interesting to see if the High Court narrows the definition I hope it does. This weakens our system and the antics of some of our politicians has left a lot to be desired it would be nice to see a more bipartisan response to this mess.

@Johnc said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

it would be nice to see a more bipartisan response to this mess.

Arhh but… then they would have to dig up something equally distracting to keep the media feed wouldn’t they?
How else do they mange to sneak through stuff they don’t want Joe Public to know about?

@Cliff-Rogers said in Well that's settled it, I can't run for parliament.:

it would be nice to see a more bipartisan response to this mess.

Wait until they have to vote on a salary increase.

That is the sort of stuff they don’t want Joe Public to notice.

I don’t think they have to vote on that, it is decided by an independent body so the pollies can’t be accused of feathering their own nest.
Of course it is fairly obvious that this “independent” body is not the same one that decides wages and pension increases.

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