Windows 2019

Outside is already painted. Inside is already finished with polyu.

@wongo said in Windows 2019:

It will be fine Termy. Trust me.

Anyone else here prepared to use Maple in an exposed external situation? Not this little black duck thank you, one pinpoint of water entry and you can kiss your good work goodbye.

In Queensland at least, silky oak was a traditional joinery timber. If you leave bare silkyoak in the rain it pretty much dissolves, BUT if you prime it properly with an oil based primer and paint it with a good quality oilbased paint, well there are an awful lot of 100 year old windows around.

Maple I suspect is a bit more durable, but water based paints are the enemy here I suspect.

It won’t be a problem in Wongo’s lifetime.

@bitingmidge said in Windows 2019:

It won’t be a problem in Wongo’s lifetime.

Sliding window will break the coating down with wear, and I’m sure Wongo has a lot of years left yet. As they say, time will tell.

Termite, when I say trust me I really mean it. I am not your average clueless builders who do things in a hurry.

The windows were made, finished and painted in the shed before they were installed. Every bit that is exposed in the weather has 4 coats of outdoor paint, so the maple is well protected.
Look at the last picture. The amount of Maple this is exposed outside is very little. The large panels (next to the glass panels) are Villaboards not Maple. I made the whole thing in such a way that water cannot stay on the surfaces. I will post so close-ups and you will see what I mean.

The sliding days are on wheels so the wear will be at its minimum and it is easy to apply more poly if necessary.

As long as I keep painting them every couple of years I am confident they will last a while.

@wongo said in Windows 2019:

As long as I keep painting them every couple of years I am confident they will last a while.

yep!

AhA! You’ve nailed it, maintenance. Most people don’t do anything until something stops working.

Girlchild does that, she was complaining that a tyre on her Landcruiser kept going flat, the steel belts were hanging out of it.

@termite said in Windows 2019:

AhA! You’ve nailed it, maintenance. Most people don’t do anything until something stops working.

So the issue here not the timber. Even Western Red Cedar needs to be looked after all the time.

@wongo said in Windows 2019:

So the issue here not the timber. Even Western Red Cedar needs to be looked after all the time.

To a certain extent it was about the timber, the softer the timber the more susceptible it is to dry rot. Dry rot is/was a terrible problem with wooden boats due to the nooks and crannies that fresh water can hide in. In the East the favoured timber, when it was still readily available, was Teak due to its anti rot properties. Similarly in Australia Spotted Gum is still favoured for the same reason, in fact large sections of the state Forest on the South Coast NSW have all the Spotted Gum reserved for boat building.
I can understand your choice of timber for its decorative looks, whereas a harder timber would have been more practical for someone with a lesser attitude to maintenance.

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